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Reporting Formulas

This topic provides an overview to working with formulas in TeamConnect Business Intelligence along with important tips and examples.

Formulas are custom calculations performed on one or more fields in your data. They offer an important way to analyze results and express business logic. The formula capabilities are designed around several principles:

  • Create complex business calculations without IT or technical knowledge.
  • Easily combine fields from different data sources together.
  • Customize formulas to reflect specific criteria and conditions.
  • Work with raw data without the need to summarize data sets before creating formulas.
  • Instantly recalculate formulas based on any filter, variable or level of granularity.

Use the Formula Editor to create formulas that define the values and filters of a widget.

The following table provides a reference to the main formula functions. 

Goal  Function Types and Syntax
Perform calculation based on criteria Measured value Value Filters: ≠ , =, >, <, between
Text Filters: Contains, Doesn't Contain, Doesn't End With, Doesn't Start With, Ends With, Start With, Equals, Not Equal
List Filter: Include, Exclude
Ranking Filters: Top, Bottom Ranking
Time Filter: Date and Calendar
Combine data/apply simple mathematics Aggregate functions Operator: +,-,*,/
Aggregate: Sum()
Average: Avg()
Count: Count(), DupCount()
Range: Max()/Min()
Summarize data Statistical function Central Tendency: Median(), Model, Largest()
Std Deviation and Variance: Stdev(), Stdevp(), Varp(), Var()
Quartile and Percentile: Quartile(), Percentile()
Accumulate data Rolling sum/average Sum to Date: YTDSum(), QTDSum, MTDSum()
Avg to Date: YTDAvg, QTDAvg, MTDAvg()
Compare Time or Trends Time functions Past Periods: PastYear(), PastQuarter(), PastMonth(), Next(), Prev()
Growth Trend: Growth(), GrowthRate()
Time Difference: YDiff(), QDiff(), MDiff(), DDiff(), HDiff(), MnDiff(), SDiff()

Using the Formula Editor

The Formula Editor is where Designers define formulas for a dashboard's widgets.

To open the Formula Editor:

  • For a new widget, click Select Data, and then the  function  button.
  • For an existing widget, click the  edit formula button .

The Formula Editor has two tabs, the Data Browser to select fields and the Functions tab to select formula operations. You can create a formula combining one or more function, field and filters. The following diagram highlights the main components of the formula panel.

  1. Functions are operations which perform different calculations, for example a sum. Use the Jump To menu or the search box to quickly find the formula you need.
  2. Fields in the Data Browser are variables contained in the data set (ElastiCube). Clicking a field in the data browser will include it as part of the formula.
  3. Filters can be applied to restrict formulas based on criteria.
  4. Starring is a way to save a formula as a favorite for later use.
  5. The Formula Editor window can be expanded by clicking the expand button at the top right.

Creating and Editing a Formula for a Widget

The Data Browser enables you to define formulas (freeform expressions) that define the values and filters of a widget.

To define a formula:

  1. Open the Formula Editor in the Data Browser. The Data Browser then changes to display the Formula Editor, which has two tabs:
    • The Data Browser tab provides fields to choose from.
    • The Functions tab lists the functions that you can include in your formula by selecting them. You can read a description of each function in a tooltip by hovering over it.
  2. Define the formula as follows:
    • From the Data Browser tab, select one or more fields.
    • From the Functions tab, select the required functions.
  3. Type in the required parts of the formula. For examples, see Formulas Based on Criteria and Conditions, and Functions to Build Formulas.
  4. Click OK.

To edit a formula, right-click the formula and select one of the following from the context menu:

  • Rename: Rename the formula, for example, give a name that represents a real-life task or expected result from the formula, or include in the name filters that you have added to the formula.
  • Filter: Add filters to the formula.
  • Type: Change the default aggregation method, for example, from Sum to Average.

Reusing Formulas

You can reuse formulas that you have previously marked as a favorite (starred). 

NOTE: Changing a starred formula does not affect previous uses of that formula which will continue to use the old version of the formula. Only future uses of the starred formula will implement your latest formula.

To mark a formula as a Favorite:

  1. While defining a formula, click the Favorite (Star) button.
  2. Enter a name for the formula.
  3. Click OK.

To reuse a favorite formula, select it in the Data Browser tab.


Using Quick Functions

Just like reusing formulas, quick functions is another feature to make working with formulas easier. The Widget Designer provides a variety of predefined commonly used functions that you can easily apply in the Data Browser when selecting a value to be included in a widget.

Quick Functions instantly add a time dimension to any existing value and formula. These functions include calculations for past values, change over time, contribution and running totals. Quick Functions include all the Time Functions previously discussed but they can only be accessed by clicking a formula that is already present in a widget.

To use a quick function:

  1. Hover over and click the menu icon of a numeric field in the data panel of the widget designer and select Quick Functions from the menu. A list of commonly used functions is displayed.
  2.  Select a function. The widget will be updated immediately.

To add aggregate functions to your formula without opening the formula editor, click the Value icon and select the function to apply to your formula.

Creating Formulas Based on Criteria and Conditions (Filters)

Often formulas must take into account specific criteria. A feature called Measured Value, which like the SUMIF function in Excel, only performs a calculation when the values meet a set of criteria. Criteria for Measured Values can be based on any logical operators in a filter.

To filter the formula:

  1. In the Data Browser, create your formula from the Data Browser and Functions tabs, as explained in Formula Editor.
  2. Add the field (criteria) by which you want to filter the formula. Right-click the field and select Filter.
  3. You can then filter the formula by listed items, text options, ranking, etc. When done, click OK.

A simple example of Measured Value is the use of a list filter. A marketing team may need to count leads generated for a specific region such as North America. Even if leads come from many different countries, the measured value calculates leads generated only when the lead originates from the United States or Canada.


A more sophisticated case is the use of a ranking filter. For example a sales team may want to track the contribution of best-selling products to total revenue. However, what constitutes a popular product may change over time. A measured value can be created for sales which includes a condition that only shows sales for the top products for any month. This simultaneously filters the data but also takes into account changes in what classifies as a top product over time.

 

Measured Values are a powerful feature to take into account business logic and quickly perform calculations only when a specific set of criteria is met.
Note: If your widget is filtered using measured values, then the measured value will override any other widget or dashboard filters you have for the same fields.

Building Formulas with Functions

Functions are operations that perform common types of calculations, and can be used to build formulas. This section describes four types of functions. 

Combine Data: Aggregate Functions

Aggregations are used to perform mathematical calculations on data. You can run multiple aggregations on several fields simultaneously to easily summarize data based on multiple factors.

For example, a sales manager can create a pivot table to show the average sales revenue for each sales rep.

A more complex example is a multi-pass aggregation (or grouping) that is an aggregation that performs multiple calculations simultaneously. The sales manager wants to also see average sales per day for each sales rep. Instead of having to add an additional column for day in the pivot table, the manager can create a multi-pass aggregation that first performs a sum of sales per day and then averages the results for each rep. This requires two fields – a day from a date field and the revenue field, as well as two aggregations, sum of sales and average. The result is the sales manager does not need to add a column for days in the pivot.

Summarize Data: Statistical Functions

Descriptive statistics provide meaningful summaries of data and help make more informed decisions, particularly important for large data sets where descriptive statistics can help to focus analysis.

An example of statistical functions is a marketing team that has a large data set on leads generated from various channels and want to understand where to focus their budget. Descriptive statistics can be used to summarize valuable insight about each channel such as the central tendency or median leads generated along with standard deviations to assess typical lead volume.

Accumulate Data: Running Total and Average

Often, to measure performance, data must be viewed in a continuous and accumulative format over extended periods such as years, quarters or months. You can use functions to create running totals and averages over standard or custom time periods.

For example, a support team has a goal to reduce the average monthly cost to resolve open issues. A Year to Date Average can be used to track progress towards reducing the average cost of support.

Change over Time: Time Functions

Time is critical for business decisions, time functions make it easy to compare outcomes at different points in time, determine growth rates and calculate the time differences. Functions can be set for common time periods such as year, month or day as well as for custom periods.

For example, an executive team wants to compare growth in revenue to the same period in the previous year. A Difference in Past Year function can be used to compare past values based on the current month to the same month in the previous year.

Function Reference

The following tables list of the functions you can use in the formula editor:

Statistical Functions

Name Function Description Example
Average Avg(<numeric Field>) Calculates the mean average of the given values

Avg(Score) will calculate the mean average of the given scores.

Avg(<group by field>, <aggregation>) calculates the average of the given aggregation grouped by another filed.

Avg( Product, Total Sales) will calculates the average of the total sales per product.

Contribution Contribution(<numeric field>) Calculates the percentage of total. Contribution( Total Sales ) calculates the percentage of total sales per group (for example per day or per product) out of total sales (for all days or all products).
Correlation CORREL(<Numeric Field a>, <Numeric Field b>)

Returns the correlation coefficient of two numeric fields.

CORREL(Revenue, Cost) will return the correlation between revenue and cost.

CORREL(<group by field>, <aggregation a>, <aggregation b>)returns the correlation coefficient of two fields aggregations grouped by another field.

CORREL(Products, AVG(Revenue), AVG(Cost)) will return the correlation between the average of revenue and cost per product.

Count Count(<Numeric Field>) Counts the number of unique values within the given values.  
Count All DupCount(<Numeric Field>) Returns the actual item count of the given list of items, including duplicates.  
Covariance (Population) COVARP(<Numeric Field a>, <Numeric Field b>) Returns the population covariance of <Numeric Field a> and <Numeric Field b>.

COVARP(Revenue, Cost) will return the population covariance of revenue and cost.

COVARP(<group by field>, <aggregation a>, <aggregation b>) returns the population covariance of two fields aggregations grouped by another field.

COVARP(Products, AVG(Revenue), AVG(Cost)) will return the population covariance of the average revenue and the average cost per product.

Covariance (Sample) COVAR(<Numeric Field a>, <Numeric Field b>) Returns the sample covariance of <Numeric Field a> and <Numeric Field b>.

COVAR(Revenue, Cost) will return the sample covariance of revenue and cost.

COVAR(<group by field>, <aggregation a>, <aggregation b>)

Returns the sample covariance of two fields aggregations grouped by another field.

COVAR(Products, AVG(Revenue), AVG(Cost)) will return the sample covariance of the average revenue and the average cost per product.

Exponential Distribution EXPONDIST(<numeric value>, <lambda>, <Cumulative (true/false)>) Returns the exponential distribution for a given value and a supplied distribution parameter lambda. Cumulative: TRUE = Cumulative distribution function, FALSE = Probability density function. EXPONDIST( Count(Leads), 2, False ) will return the exponential distribution density of the number of leads per country where lambda is 2.  
Intercept INTERCEPT(<field>, <numeric value>) Returns the intercept of the linear regression line through a supplied series of x- and y- values.

INTERCEPT(Date.Quarter, Total Sales) will return the intercept of the regression line that represents the trend over quarter of the sum of sales.
Largest

LARGEST(<Numeric Field>, <k>) returns the k-th largest value in a field.

Maximum Max(<Numeric Field>) Returns the maximum value among the given values.  
Median MEDIAN( <Numeric Field> ) Calculates the median of the given values. The median of a set of data is the middlemost number in the set. The median is also the number that is halfway into the set.  
Minimum Min(<Numeric Field>) Returns the minimum value among the given values.  
Mode MODE(<Numeric Field>) Returns the most frequently occurring value from the column.  
Normal Distribution NORMDIST(<Numeric Field>, <Mean>, <Standard Deviation>, <Cumulative (true/false)>) Returns the standard normal distribution for a given value, a supplied distribution mean and standard deviation. Cumulative: TRUE = Cumulative Normal Distribution Function, FALSE = Normal Probability Density Function. NORMDIST(Score, ( Mean(Score), All(Score)), ( STDEV(Score), All(Score) ), False ) will return the normal probability density of a given score.
Percentile PERCENTILE(<Numeric Field>, <k>) Returns the k-th percentile value from the given field. k is any number between 0..1 (inclusive).  
Possion Distribution POISSONDIST( <numeric value>, <mean>, <Cumulative (true/false)>) Returns the poisson distribution for a given value and a supplied distribution mean. Cumulative: TRUE = Cumulative distribution function, FALSE = Probability mass function. POISSONDIST( Score, ( Mean(Score), All(Score) ), ( STDEV(Score), All(Score) ), False ) will return the poisson probability density of a given number of sales
Quartile QUARTILE(<Numeric Field>, <k>) Returns the k-th quartile for the given field. 
k = 0 returns the Minimum value
    k = 1 returns the first quartile (25th percentile)
    k = 2 returns the Median value (50th percentile)
    k = 3 returns the third quartile (75th percentile)
    k = 4 returns the Maximum value
 
Rank RANK(<numeric value>, [DESC/ASC], [Rank Type], [<group by field 1>,... , <group by field n>]) Returns the rank of a value in a list of values

[DESC/ASC] – Optional. By default sort order is descending.

[Rank Type] – Optional. By default the type is standard competition ranking (“1224” ranking). Support also modified competition ranking (“1334” ranking), dense ranking (“1223” ranking) and ordinal ranking (“1234” ranking).

[<Group by field 1>,… , <Group by field n>] – Optional. Rank partitions fields.

RANK(Total Cost, “ASC”, “1224”, Product, Years) will return the rank of the total annual cost per each product were sorted in ascending order.
Running Sum (RSUM) RSUM ( <numeric value> ), RSUM ( <numeric value> , <continuous> ) Returns the running total of the measure by the defined dimension according to the current sorting order in the widget.

By default, RSUM accumulates a measure by the sorting order of the dimension. To accumulate by another order, the relevant measure should be added as an additional column and sorted.

<continuous> is a boolean value that that accumulates the sum continuously when there are two or more dimensions. The default value is False.
Note: Filtering the RSUM column by Values, filters the dimensions and recalculates the RSUM from the first filtered value.

 
Skewness (Population) SKEWP(<numeric value>) Returns the skewness of the distribution of a given value in the population. SKEWP(Revenue) will return the skewness of the distribution of revenue in the population.

Skewness (Sample)

SKEW(<numeric value>) Returns the skewness of the distribution of a given value. SKEW(Revenue) will return the skewness of the distribution of revenue.
Slope SLOPE(<field>, <numeric value>) Returns the slope of the linear regression line through a supplied series of x- and y- values. SLOPE(Date.Quarter, Total Sales) will return the slope of the regression line that represent the trend over quarter of the sum of sales.
Standard Deviation (Population) STDEVP( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the Standard Deviation of the given values (Population). Standard deviation is the square root of the average squared deviation from the mean. The standard deviation of a population gives researchers the amount of dispersion of data for an entire population of survey respondents.  
Standard Deviation (Sample) STDEV( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the Standard Deviation of the given values (Sample). Standard deviation is the square root of the average squared deviation from the mean. A standard deviation of a sample estimates the amount of dispersion in a given data set, based on a random sample.  
T Distribution TDIST( <numeric value x>,<degrees_freedom>, <Cumulative (true/false)>) Returns the student’s T-distribution for a given value and a supplied number of degrees of freedom (must be ≥ 1). Cumulative: TRUE = Cumulative Distribution Function, FALSE = Probability Density Function. TDIST( Score, 3, TRUE ) will return the student’s T-distribution of a given score, with 3 degrees of freedom.
Variance (Population) VARP( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the Variance of the given values (Population). Variance (Sample) is the average squared deviation from the mean, based on an entire population of survey respondents.  
Variance (Sample) VAR( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the Variance of the given values (Sample). Variance (Sample) is the average squared deviation from the mean, based on a random sample of the population.  

Mathematical Functions

Name Function Description Example
Absolute Abs(<Numeric value>) Returns the absolute value of the given value. ABS(Cost), where the absolute result for the value ‘2’ or ‘-2’ is ‘2’.
Acos ACOS(<numeric value>) Returns the angle, in radians, whose cosine is the given numeric expression. Also referred to as arccosine. ACOS(Total Revenue) will return the angle, in radians, whose cosine is the given total revenue.
Asin ASIN(<numeric value>) Returns the angle, in radians, whose sine is the given numeric expression. Also referred to as arcsine. ASIN(Total Revenue) will return the angle, in radians, whose sine is the given total revenue.
Atan ATAN(<numeric value>) Returns the angle in radians whose tangent is the given numeric expression. Also referred to as arctangent. ATAN(Total Revenue) will return the angle in radians whose tangent is the given total revenue.
Ceiling CEILING(<numeric value>) Returns number rounded up, away from zero, to the nearest multiple of significance. CEILING(Cost), where the result of ‘83.2’ rounded up is ’84’.
Cos COS(<numeric value>) Returns the trigonometric cosine of the given angle (in radians). COS(Average Angle) will return the trigonometric cosine of the average angle.
Cosh COSH(<numeric value>) Returns the hyperbolic cosine of the given value. COSH(Total Revenue) will return the hyperbolic cosine of the total revenue.
Cot COT(<numeric value>) Returns the trigonometric cotangent of the given angle (in radians). COT(Average Angle) will return the trigonometric cotangent of the average angle.
Exp EXP(<numeric value>) Returns the exponential value of the given value. EXP(Sales) will return the exponential value of sales.
Floor FLOOR(<numeric value>) Returns number rounded down, toward zero, to the nearest multiple of ‘1’. FLOOR(Revenue), where the result of ‘88.6’ rounded down is ’88’.
Ln LN(<numeric value>) Returns the base-e logarithm of the given value. LN(Cost) will return the base-e logarithm of cost.
Log10 LOG10(<numeric value>) Returns the base-10 logarithm of the given value. LOG10(Revenue) will return the base-10 logarithm of revenue.
Mod MOD(<numeric value>, divisor) Returns the remainder after a number is divided by a divisor. MOD(Cost, 10), where the reminder of ‘255’ divided by ’10’ is ‘5’.
Power Power(value, power) Returns the results of the given value raised to a supplied power. POWER(Revenue, 2) will return revenue raised by the power of 2.
Quotient QUOTIENT(<numeric value>, divisor) Returns the integer portion of a division. QUOTIENT(Cost, 2), where the integer portion of ‘5’ divided by ‘2’ is ‘2’.
Round ROUND(<numeric value>, num_digits) Returns number rounded to a specified number of digits. ROUND(Revenue, 2) will return the revenue rounded to two decimal places.
Sin SIN(<numeric value>) Returns the trigonometric sine of the given angle (in radians). SIN(Average Angle) will return the trigonometric sine of the average angle.
Sinh SINH(<numeric value>) Returns the hyperbolic sine of the given value. SINH(Total Revenue) will return the hyperbolic sine of the total revenue.
Square root SQRT(<Numeric value>) Returns the square root of the given value. SQRT(Cost) will return the square root of cost.
Sum Sum(<Numeric Field>) Calculates the total of the given values.  
Tan TAN(<numeric value>) Returns the trigonometric tangent of the given angle (in radians). TAN(Average Angle) will return the trigonometric tangent of the average angle.
Tanh TANH(<numeric value>) Returns the hyperbolic tangent of the given value. TANH(Total Revenue) will return the hyperbolic tangent of the total revenue.

Time Related Functions

Name Function Description Example
Day Difference DDiff( <Start Time>, <End Time> ) Returns the difference between <Start Time> and <End Time> in days.  
Growth Growth( <Numeric Value> ) Calculates growth over time. The time dimension to be used is determined by the time resolution in the widget/dashboard.

Formula: (current value – compared value) / compared value.
If this month your value is 12, and last month it was 10, your Growth for this month is 20% (0.2).
    Calculation: (12 – 10) / 10 = 0.2
If this year your value is 80, and last year it was 100, your Growth for this year is -20% ( -0.2).
    Calculation: (80 – 100) / 100 = -0.2
Hour Difference HDiff( <Start Time>, <End Time> ) Returns the difference between <Start Time> and <End Time> in hours.  
Prev Prev( <Time Field> [, <N>] ) Returns the Time period Member in <Time Field> which is N periods back from the current Member. This function only works as a scope function and not by itself. This formula will return the numeric value 2 months ago:
(<Numeric Value>, Prev(<Month Field>, 2))
Minute Difference MnDiff( <Start Time>, <End Time> ) Returns the difference between <Start Time> and <End Time> in minutes.  
Month Difference MDiff( <Start Time>, <End Time> ) Returns the difference between <Start Time> and <End Time> in months. Returns whole numbers.  
Month to Date Average MTDAvg( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the running average starting from the beginning of the month up to the current time period member.The time dimension to be used is determined by the time resolution in the widget/dashboard.
Returns 0 if the active time resolution is quarters or years.
 
Month to Date Sum MTDSum( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the running total starting from the beginning of the month up to the current time period member. The time dimension to be used is determined by the time resolution in the widget/dashboard.
Returns 0 if the active time resolution is quarters or years.
 
Next Next( <Time Field> [, <N>] ) Returns the Time period Member in <Time Field> which is N periods after the current Member. This function only works as a scope function and not by itself. This formula will return the numeric value 2 months ahead of now:
(<Numeric Value>, Next(<Month Field>, 2)
Now Now(<Day from Date field>) Returns the value for the current time period. Supports day, month, quarter or year. The Now function receives a date dimension and its level and returns all the members in that dimension which match the current query execution time.
Note: This function only works as a scope function and not by itself.
The following example will return the value for the current day.(

[Total Sales], Now([Days in Datefield]))
Past Year PastYear( <Numeric Value> ) Calculates the value for the same period in the past (previous) year.   If you’re looking at a specific day, you will see the value of the same day one year back.
    If you’re looking at a specific month, you will see the value of the same month one year back.

Note: When using the Past Year function in a weeks table and using a week filter, no results are returned.
 
Past Quarter PastQuarter( <Numeric Value> ) Calculates the value for the same period in the past (previous) quarter.   If you’re looking at a specific day, you will see the value of the same day one quarter back.
    If you’re looking at a specific month, you will see the value of the same month one quarter back.
Past Month PastMonth( <Numeric Value> ) Calculates the value for the same period in the past (previous) month. If you’re looking at a specific day, you will see the value of the same day one month back.
Quarter Difference QDiff( <Start Time>, <End Time> ) Returns the difference between <Start Time> and <End Time> in quarters. Returns whole numbers.  
Quarter to Date Average QTDAvg( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the running average starting from the beginning of the quarter up to the current time period member.

he time dimension to be used is determined by the time resolution in the widget/dashboard,

Returns 0 if the active time resolution is years.
 
Quarter to Date Sum QTDSum( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the running total starting from the beginning of the quarter up to the current time period member.
The time dimension to be used is determined by the time resolution in the widget/dashboard.
Returns 0 if the active time resolution is years.
 
Range range( <Field1>, <Field2> ) Returns a graphical range selector for a data set where two members of the same dimension and level define the minimum and maximum values of the range.  
Second Difference SDiff( <Start Time>, <End Time> ) Returns the difference between <Start Time> and <End Time> in seconds.  
Year Difference YDiff( <Start Time>, <End Time> ) Returns the difference between <Start Time> and <End Time> in years. Returns whole numbers.  
Year to Date Average YTDAvg( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the running average starting from the beginning of the year up to the current time period member. The time dimension to be used is determined by the time resolution in the widget/dashboard.  
Year to Date Sum YTDSum( <Numeric Value> ) Returns the running total starting from the beginning of the year up to the current time period member. The time dimension to be used is determined by the time resolution in the widget/dashboard.

Other Functions

Name Function Description Example
All All(<Field>) Ignores the scope set on the dimension.  
Ordering ORDERING(<expression1>,<expression2>) Returns the numeric order position of rows sorted into ascending or descending order, breaking ties with further arguments. The expressions must be aggregated by applying the MIN/MAX functions as in the example. ORDERING(MIN([Sales Person Name]), MIN([Days in Transaction_Date]), -1*Sum([Sales]))
Rdouble RDOUBLE(<R expression>, <numeric value 1>, [<numeric value 2>, ..., <numeric value n>] ) Returns a numeric result for a given R expression and a list of numeric values (use ‘args’ in the R expression to reference numeric values parameters). The R expression is passed to the running Rserve.The optional ordering expression determines the order in which the rows are sent to R. The argument of the Ordering parameter can be an index in your data source or you can use the ORDERING() function to determine the order of the field. RDOUBLE(“m <- log(matrix(unlist(args), ncol=2)); kmeans(m,3)$cluster”, [Total Cost], [Total Revenue]) will return the k-means cluster (R expression) of the args: [Total Cost] and [Total Revenue].

RDOUBLE(<recycle>, <R expression>, <numeric value 1>, [<numeric value 2>, ..., <numeric value n>] )

recycle = TRUE (default) – Results will be cached for unchanged functions and data.

recycle = FALSE – Results will not be cached. Use this option if your R code contains randomality.
Rint RINT(<R expression>, <numeric value 1>, [<numeric value 2>, ..., <numeric value n>] ) Returns an integer result for a given R expression and a list of numeric values (use ‘args’ in the R expression to reference numeric values parameters). The R expression is passed to the running Rserve. The optional ordering expression determines the order in which the rows are sent to R. The argument of the Ordering parameter can be an index in your data source or you can use the ORDERING() function to determine the order of the field. RINT(“m <- log(matrix(unlist(args), ncol=2)); kmeans(m,3)$cluster”, [Total Cost], [Total Revenue]) will return the k-means cluster (R expression) of the args: [Total Cost] and [Total Revenue].

RINT(<recycle>, <R expression>, <numeric value 1>, [<numeric value 2>, ..., <numeric value n>] )

recycle = TRUE (default) – Results will be cached for unchanged functions and data.

recycle = FALSE – Results will not be cached. Use this option if your R code contains randomality.

 

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